Cabinet & Countertop Inspirations

Over the last couple of years, the popularity of quartz countertops has increased significantly. The majority of our clients are choosing quartz, instead of granite, solid surface, or laminate for their kitchen or bathroom projects. This shift is due in part to quartz manufacturers developing the ability to create random patterns and more color options. It also helps that quartz does not require any maintenance. The major manufacturers of quartz tops are Cambria, Caesarstone, and Silestone.

Read on for additional information on quartz countertops.

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What is Quartz?

Quartz is a man-made, engineered material with characteristics very similar to natural stone. It is sometimes referred to as man-made granite. Quartz countertops are made by grinding natural-quartz crystals into a dust or aggregate and then fusing with resin binders and color pigments. This is done under heat and pressure to form a solid slab. Pieces of glass or metallic flecks may also be added for more visual interest. The slab is then cut to the correct measurements in the same manner as granite, with a variety of edge profiles.

Like granite, quartz tops are very heavy. Installation is not typically a DIY project and should be left to certified installers.

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Pros/Cons of Quartz

Quartz has a number of benefits. As mentioned above, quartz is non-porous, making it maintenance-free. Many customers select quartz based solely on this characteristic. Granite, on the other hand, requires regular sealing. Quartz is also anti-microbial. Finally, a number of quartz colors come in "jumbo slabs." These slabs are larger than normal, allowing fewer or no seams in a counter or island top.

On the downside, quartz is typically more expensive than other countertop materials, including granite. Quartz cannot be used in outdoor settings as direct UV light can impact colors.

If you are considering new countertops, stop in our Carmel, Indiana showroom and we will be happy to talk with you about all the countertop options, including quartz.

 

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A kitchen remodel can be complicated enough without the addition of drama. Cranky neighbors and spiteful construction workers can make your project go from disruptive to torturous in a hurry. You may want to brush up on your remodeling etiquette before passive-aggressive (or just aggressive) overtures from neighbors or workers consume your life.

When dealing with neighbors, the National Association of Home Builders' website suggests the following measures:

  • "Let neighbors know well in advance about your home remodeling plans and keep them apprised of progress, detail by detail. Tell them when work will begin, the approximate completion date, what work will be done and whether workers might have to come onto their property. If delays arise, promptly contact your neighbors to inform them of the revised schedule."
  • "Make sure noisy power tools are only used during standard business hours. Reasonable hours are 8am to 5pm."
  • "Inform your neighbors of any large trucks entering the neighborhood and ask subcontractors to park on one side of the street only."

Since you are paying the construction crew that is working on your home, you might not feel like they are entitled to anything extra. How you treat them is clearly your perogative, but small gestures can help keep morale from dropping.

One suggestion is to provide contractors with bottled water or pop. This is not expensive and can help work move along, especially during the hot days of summer.

The amount of dust and dirt that accumulates during a kitchen renovation can be alarming. While you cannot stop it completely, you can prepare for it. Here are a few tips ...

  • Protect what you cannot remove; floors should be covered, dust curtains hung and a pathway defined for workmen to enter and exit the workspace. Use plastic sheeting and tape to seal off doorways into other rooms and cover bookshelves, furniture, and electronic equipment. This work is often included in the contractor's scope of work.
  • Turn off the central air or heat when the workers are sanding floors. Keep extra air filters on hand and change them frequently.
  • Ask that the construction area be swept at the end of every day to minimize the mess.
  • If necessary, prepare a storage area in the garage or in another room near the kitchen for holding appliances, cabinets, and other items until it's time to install them. Or rent a storage space for a month or two during the construction phase.

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Sometimes it will be necessary to rent a large dumpster (like the one in the above photo) so the construction crew can dispose of large amounts of debris. Whether you use a large dumpster or not, if the construction crew is going to take debris outside your home, you should set up some ground rules for where trash is put, as well as some rules about how construction workers should exit your home.

The inside of your home will be in disarray when you renovate, but the outside of your home doesn't need to have a trampled lawn and random piles of garbage. The National Association of the Remodeling Industry recommends the following rules to preserve landscaping and curb appeal:

  • Ask that all lumber and materials be stored on paved surfaces, not your grass
  • If that is not possible, designate a path across your lawn with stakes and string - allow several access points and try to keep the path as direct as possible
  • You may want to lay down temporary plywood sidewalks - they distribute weight and will prevent ruts in your lawn. Standing the plywood up at the end of each work day will help preserve the grass. Be sure to remove the plywood as soon as the work is done.

About The KitchenWright

The KitchenWright, in Carmel Indiana has been offering Indianapolis-area homeowners innovative design, excellent service, and fine cabinetry since 2001.  Originally located in the Village of West Clay, The KitchenWright worked on numerous new home and remodeling projects in the Village of West Clay and throughout the northside of Indianapolis. In 2008, The KitchenWright became a part of Spiceland Wood Products.  This partnership provided us with additional resources and custom wood-working capability to meet our residential and client’s cabinetry, countertop, or molding needs.  During this time, the business relocated to a Rangeline Road, in the heart of Carmel’s bustling City Center.
 
The KitchenWright is a local, family-owned business that values the pursuit of excellence, honesty and integrity.  We constantly work to ensure the well-being of our clients, employees, and others we interact with on a daily basis.
 
The KitchenWright’s services include a variety of cabinet lines, countertops, and installation expertise to make residential, commercial, and industrial projects a success.  We also provide custom designed and manufactured wood products for unique, one-of-a-kind projects.  Our talented designers, installation crews, and custom woodworkers provide expert attention throughout your project, to achieve our goal of happy, delighted customers.  
 
Our Carmel showroom services clients throughout Central Indiana including Indianapolis, Zionsville, Westfield, Fishers, and Noblesville. Let us help make your next project a wonderful success!