Cabinet Inspirations & Ideas

Choosing Your Kitchen Sink

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Picking a kitchen sink is a relatively simple process, right? Actually, it’s more complicated than you may think. With a myriad of options in everything from how it’s made to how it’s mounted, you have more than a couple decisions to make when choosing the right sink for your kitchen. Let’s break down some of your options.

Material

  • Stainless Steel- A long time favorite, this sink still remains very popular today. Often more affordable than other materials, stainless steel is also heat and stain resistant. When shopping for a stainless sink, look for one with a lower gauge number. This indicates thicker steel which will be less likely to dent or vibrate when a disposal is running. 16 or 18 is a desirable gauge number, and the 300 series offers the best protection from corrosion and staining. The negatives of stainless would be its vulnerability to scratches and its propensity to show water spots.

 

  • Solid Surface- These sinks are made from the same material as the countertops of the same name. When paired with a solid surface countertop, the result is a sleek, seamless appearance without the presence of any ridges or edges. Minor scratches or cuts are oftentimes repairable. Negatives would include the price tag, which is higher than that of other sink choices. Also, they do not tolerate high heat well, such as that of a pot transferred directly from a stove.

 

 

  • Quartz Chip- Made by combining crushed quartz with resin filler, this sink is extremely durable and should last a long time. It is non porous and highly resistant to stains, scratches, and chips. The heat resistance of the quartz sink surpasses that of solid surface. Its hardness may be the only downside. If a dish is dropped in a quartz sink, your sink will survive, but your dish will not!

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    Cast Iron- This is one of the oldest materials used for sinks, and its popularity endures. Like the previously mentioned quartz sink, the cast iron sink is also incredible durable and long lasting. Behind the appealing glossy finish is a tough stain resisting surface. Minor scratches and chips can be repaired, and maintenance is relatively easy with this sink. The downside to cast iron is that the enamel can chip. This exposes the iron underneath which can begin to rust over time. The weight of cast iron also makes installation trickier, especially if being installed as an undermount.

     

Installation

  • Self Rimming- More commonly known as a drop-in sink, this is the most common sink choice in many homes as well as the easiest to install. A cutout is made in the top of the countertop, and the sink is lowered into the cutout. The flanges of the sink that overlap the cutout are the sink’s support. They also, unfortunately, form a barrier between the countertop and sink that catches unwanted crumbs and debris while cleaning.

 

  • Undermount- As opposed to being installed from the top, an undermount sink is attached from under the countertop. This eliminates the metal lip of a drop in sink and permits you to brush crumbs or liquid from the countertop directly into the sink without any interference. 

 

In addition to the variety of choices in material, there are many accessories and options to make your kitchen sink more functional and versatile. In our next blog, we’ll discuss different sink sizes as well as the little “extras” you can add to give your sink some personality. Please give us a call or stop by our Carmel, Indiana showroom to learn more about choosing the right sink for your remodeling project.

 


 

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